Category: Slider

Lectio Divina for this Sunday, Divine Mercy Sunday

Lectio Divina is a form of meditation rooted in liturgical celebration that dates back to early monastic communities. It involves focused reading of Scripture (lectio), meditation on the Word of God (meditatio), contemplation of the Word and its meaning in one’s life (contemplatio) and ends with prayer (oratio). For the Easter season, we have Lectio Divina resources for the Sunday Gospels and the Ascension of the Lord.

Echoes from the Mission in East Timor: “Where is the road?”

To read the entire post, click here.

It has been a long time we received visitors on this island. This year, however, our Lenten season was specially blessed with three visits at the same time; the Mother General of our Congregation and her entourage, the Master of the Order with his entourage and Fr Felicíssimo. With gratitude to God for this time of grace, we share our latest news with you all, especially those who have always shown much interest in knowing what is happening in our little world.

For our visitors during the period, it was a golden opportunity to experience our life and work more closely and to share a little of our daily struggles. It was an opportunity to receive the affection of the children, to know the suffering of our people, to taste the fruits of the season (heat and rain) and to experience the lack of electricity and water. The torrential rains of March are always very strong and they do much damage on our mountainous island. They do not bring flood but mud, the kind of mud that makes driving along the roads a little more risky and uncomfortable.

Sr Stella Storch, OP, helping Tanzanian orphans earn a living

To read the entire post, click here.

Sr. Stella Storch, a Dominican Sister of Sinsinawa, learned firsthand in 2000 that Tanzanian orphans whose parents were decimated by AIDS are treated like second-class citizens, left vulnerable to trafficking.

She first learned about the orphans in 1990, when Sr. Hellen Bandiho, a sister of St. Therese of the Child Jesus, came to Wisconsin from Tanzania and told her about the aftermath of the AIDS epidemic.

Three years after she helped found UNANIMA in 2001, a nongovernmental organization at the United Nations, she began “Empowering Women’s Future: AIDS Orphan Sewing Project” in Bukoba, Tanzania.

From Bused Halo: The Road to Emmaus, a Journey toward Hope

To read the entire post, click here.

Maybe you’ve met Thomas Awiapo, an ambassador for Catholic Relief Services from the African country of Ghana. He’s visited Catholic schools and parishes in every state, some of them twice. He has a story that sticks with you.

His parents died when he was very young. After that, he and his three siblings were left to fend for themselves in their small village in Ghana.

“If we had one meal a day,” Thomas says, “we were lucky.”

World Day of Vocations May 7, 2017

To read the entire post, click here.

The purpose of the World Day of Prayer for Vocations is to publically fulfill the Lord’s instruction to, “Pray the Lord of the harvest to send laborers into his harvest” (Mt 9:38; Lk 10:2). As a climax to a prayer that is continually offered throughout the Church, it affirms the primacy of faith and grace in all that concerns vocations to the priesthood and to the consecrated life.  While appreciating all vocations, the Church concentrates its attention this day on vocations to the ordained ministries(priesthood and diaconate), to the Religious life in all its forms (male and female, contemplative and apostolic), to societies of apostolic life, to secular institutes in their diversity of services and membership, and to the missionary life, in the particular sense of mission “ad gentes”.

2017 marks the 54th Anniversary of the World Day of Prayer for Vocations

NCEA 2017 – A recap

Almost 9,000 attendees arrived in Saint Louis for this year’s National Catholic Education Association Convention. While it had been a few years since I had attended an NCEA Convention, this one did not disappoint. Every NCEA I have been to has reminded me of the size of the Catholic School mission in the United States. It has always been exciting to me to pray, socialize and learn with so many educators committed to a similar Catholic mission.

Lectio Divina For Easter

For the entire post, click here.

Lectio Divina is a form of meditation rooted in liturgical celebration that dates back to early monastic communities. It involves focused reading of Scripture (lectio), meditation on the Word of God (meditatio), contemplation of the Word and its meaning in one’s life (contemplatio) and ends with prayer (oratio). For the Easter season, we have Lectio Divina resources for the Sunday Gospels and the Ascension of the Lord.

A Eucharistic Holy Hour (and other prayers) for Divine Mercy Sunday

For the entire post, click here.

Origin of Divine Mercy Sunday, the Divine Mercy image, the Chaplet, and the Novena

Saint Faustina: Mankind’s need for the message of Divine Mercy took on dire urgency in the 20th Century, when civilization began to experience an “eclipse of the sense of God” and, therefore to lose the understanding of the sanctity and inherent dignity of human life. In the 1930s, Jesus chose a humble Polish nun, St. Maria Faustina Kowalska, to receive private revelations concerning Divine Mercy that were recorded in her Diary. Bl. John Paul explains:

This was precisely the time when those ideologies of evil, nazism and communism, were taking shape. Sister Faustina became the herald of the one message capable of off-setting the evil of those ideologies, that fact that God is mercy—the truth of the merciful Christ. And for this reason, when I was called to the See of Peter, I felt impelled to pass on those experiences of a fellow Pole that deserve a place in the treasury of the universal Church.
~ Pope Saint John Paul II, Memory and Identity (2005)

Get ready to celebrate St. Catherine of Siena with this Novena

In preparation of the feast day of St Catherine of Siena on April 29 we will start a digital novena.
Each day a new prayer will appear on this site.
Please join us on www.op.org/novena or follow us through Facebook, Twitter or Instagram

What is a novena?

A novena is a traditional form of Catholic prayer.
It is an ancient devotion that consists of nine days of prayer.
Novenas are often prayed in preparation for a feast day or for a specific intention.
We pray our novena in preparation of the Feast day of St Catherine.

Dominican Sister tells of experience with refugees

Dominican-Iraqi sister Habiba Bihnam Toma spoke about the time she spent helping refugees after bombings in northern Iraq in 2014.

Toma said she and her fellow sisters did not want to leave Qaraqosh, Iraq until everyone in the village had fled, but upon hearing news that ISIS was on its way, they were forced to retreat.

“A friend called me and tearfully pleaded that the sisters leave quickly,” Toma, who began learning English in the fall, said. “ISIS had already entered…and we were in grave danger.”

To read the entire story, click here.

The DePorres Pages © 2015 Frontier Theme