Tag: abortion

Life: Homily for Monday, January 23, 2017

Today is the prayer for the legal protection of the unborn. Life. Surely there are not many more divisive issues than abortion. Those on both sides can feel passionate about the issue. Sometimes, this passion is misplaced in the ways we talk about each other. We can use very hostile words that prevent any discussion. But what struck me in watching the women’s march were some of the horrible signs people carried. One said, “If Mary had had an abortion we would not have this problem.” Another said, “A Baby should not be the punishment for sex.” I was stunned at the level of vitriol in these two signs.

What surprises me is how this is the tenor of a march for women. What was clear is organisers saw no place for women who did not believe in abortion. Sad. Certainly, there are issues to be addressed. Women do often face many issues in society that make things difficult.

But what if it were more known what the Catholic Church does on behalf of women who need assistance when their baby is born? After all, despite the often repeated false claim, people that are truly pro-life do care about the baby after he or she is born. The Catholic Church is the largest provider of social services after the federal government.

Today, let us pray for those women faced with the difficult decisions that come with pregnancy. And let us pray that by our efforts, they may see the support we provide for them in our actions.

Transcript of Pope Francis’ Press Conference Aboard Plane back to Rome

Please find below the full English transcription:

Fr. Lombardi: Holy Father, thank you for being here, as at the end of every trip, for the summary conversation, a broad look at the trip that has occurred, and for your availability to respond to so many questions from our international community. We have, like usual, asked the different language groups to organize and prepare a few questions, but naturally we begin with our colleagues from Mexico.

Maria Eugenia Jimenez Caliz, Milenio (Mexico): Holy Father, in Mexico there are thousands of “desaparecidos,” (disappeared) but the case of 43 (students) of Ayotzinapa is an emblematic case. I would like to ask you, why didn’t you meet with their families? Also, (please send) a message for the families of thousands of the “desaparecidos.”

Address to US Congress by Pope Francis

I am most grateful for your invitation to address this Joint Session of Congress in “the land of the free and the home of the brave”. I would like to think that the reason for this is that I too am a son of this great continent, from which we have all received so much and toward which we share a common responsibility.

Each son or daughter of a given country has a mission, a personal and social responsibility. Your own responsibility as members of Congress is to enable this country, by your legislative activity, to grow as a nation. You are the face of its people, their representatives. You are called to defend and preserve the dignity of your fellow citizens in the tireless and demanding pursuit of the common good, for this is the chief aim of all politics. A political society endures when it seeks, as a vocation, to satisfy common needs by stimulating the growth of all its members, especially those in situations of greater vulnerability or risk. Legislative activity is always based on care for the people. To this you have been invited, called and convened by those who elected you.

Yours is a work which makes me reflect in two ways on the figure of Moses. On the one hand, the patriarch and lawgiver of the people of Israel symbolizes the need of peoples to keep alive their sense of unity by means of just legislation. On the other, the figure of Moses leads us directly to God and thus to the transcendent dignity of the human being. Moses provides us with a good synthesis of your work: you are asked to protect, by means of the law, the image and likeness fashioned by God on every human face.

Homily for Saturday, May 9, 2015

Do you think you are greater than Jesus? This seems like a question that has an obvious answer, and of course, it does. Of course we are not greater than Jesus. It is easy to see this when we consider the magnificent works of Jesus. Healings, raising from the dead, miracles are obvious signs of the divinity of Jesus. But today’s gospel puts forth another type of comparison. Namely, those who follow Jesus will face persecution precisely because Jesus did. If we seek to imitate Jesus, we simply cannot expect to be treated differently.

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