Homily for Monday, May 11, 2015

Readings for Today

If there is a main theme in the Acts of the Apostles, it could be summed up this way: There is just no resisting the Spirit.Starting with this week’s readings there will be a special emphasis on the Advocate, as we move toward the celebration of Pentecost in a couple of weeks. This period of preparation allows us to give special attention in our prayer life to the role of the Holy Spirit in our own lives.

Today I would like to focus on this concept of Advocate. In French, the word for lawyer is advocat, or advocate. An advocate today can be a person who believes strongly in a cause and works to have a policy that will move it forward supported. While advocate seen in these ways is a noun, it is also the case that advocate can also be a verb, giving it a sense of action. A representative in government can advocate for something.

It is this dual sense of being a noun and a verb that I would like us to think about. First, the Holy Spirit, seen as an advocate, is a person, in fact, the third person of the Blessed Trinity. But the Holy Spirit can also be seen in the sense of a verb, an action, movement or outpouring. It is often described as a rushing wind, and it is God’s spirit that hovers above the waters at creation. As wind, in the gospel of John, we hear that there is a certain unpredictability to the wind. It blows where it will.

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Homily for Thursday, May 29, 2014 (Ascension transferred to Sunday)

Readings for Today

Homily for Ascension

Good teachers make their students think.  One of the ways that happens is much like what occurs in today’s gospel.  They do not answer questions, or perhaps more accurately, they answer a question by posing another question.  Such is the case in today’s gospel.  The apostles are told something they simply do not understand.  The disciples will see Jesus, then not see him, but in a little while they will see him again.  And they are confused.

It is important that Jesus is preparing the disciples for events that are to come.  But they are having a difficult time understanding the cryptic language that Jesus uses.  So why does he do this?  And why does any good teacher do this?

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