The End is Near

Readings for Today

The readings for today signify the change that happens in the last week of the liturgical year. They turn a little more harsh. They focus on last things. The judgement is coming. We are told to think about our lives and what they mean. And while there is the comfort of God’s love and care for each of us, there is also the warnings that are given to help us to stay focused upon God.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on November 27, 2018.

The End is Near

The End is Near
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 2:18
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

The readings for today signify the change that happens in the last week of the liturgical year. They turn a little more harsh. They focus on last things. The judgement is coming. We are told to think about our lives and what they mean. And while there is the comfort of God’s love and care for each of us, there is also the warnings that are given to help us to stay focused upon God.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on November 27, 2018.

What is heaven like?

What is heaven like?
Daily Homilies

 
 

00:00 / 6:35
 

1X

 

Readings for Today were taken from the Office of the Dead, as the homily was for a Dominican Feast, All Deceased Dominicans.

Just what is heaven? What does it mean to live forever? Is heaven an extended family reunion? An existence that is just a little bit better than our life here on earth? Or is it in fact something more? If it is not really that much different, why would anyone want to live forever? Life is pretty difficult. The Buddhists believe that life is suffering, and many times it seems that way. But is this really all that heaven is, something just a little better? Fortunately, the bible gives us plenty of clues that heaven is much more. Saint Paul tells us heaven, and what it is, has not even entered into our hearts. It is beyond anything we can understand. But it is absolute fulfillment. So pray for the dead. And open your heart to Jesus.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on November 8, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

What is heaven like?

Readings for Today were taken from the Office of the Dead, as the homily was for a Dominican Feast, All Deceased Dominicans.

Just what is heaven? What does it mean to live forever? Is heaven an extended family reunion? An existence that is just a little bit better than our life here on earth? Or is it in fact something more? If it is not really that much different, why would anyone want to live forever? Life is pretty difficult. The Buddhists believe that life is suffering, and many times it seems that way. But is this really all that heaven is, something just a little better? Fortunately, the bible gives us plenty of clues that heaven is much more. Saint Paul tells us heaven, and what it is, has not even entered into our hearts. It is beyond anything we can understand. But it is absolute fulfillment. So pray for the dead. And open your heart to Jesus.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on November 8, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

He will find you

He will find you
Daily Homilies

 
 

00:00 / 2:41
 

1X

 

Readings for Today

Today’s readings provide for us an important insight into God. God wants everyone to be saved. Everyone. In the first reading, we are reminded God uses a less than perfect Saint Paul to preach to the Gentiles. In the gospel, we see parables that remind us that God is always searching for us. God wants so much to forgive our sins. He so much wants a relationship with us. This is so true that God goes to any length to find us. God makes every opportunity to be available to us. He reminds us again and again the time in now for conversion. So do not waste another second. Open your heart to God. It will make all of the difference.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on November 8, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

He will find you

He will find you
Daily Homilies

 
 

00:00 / 2:41
 

1X

 

Readings for Today

Today’s readings provide for us an important insight into God. God wants everyone to be saved. Everyone. In the first reading, we are reminded God uses a less than perfect Saint Paul to preach to the Gentiles. In the gospel, we see parables that remind us that God is always searching for us. God wants so much to forgive our sins. He so much wants a relationship with us. This is so true that God goes to any length to find us. God makes every opportunity to be available to us. He reminds us again and again the time in now for conversion. So do not waste another second. Open your heart to God. It will make all of the difference.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on November 8, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

He came to bring division?

He came to bring division?
Daily Homilies

 
 

00:00 / 3:08
 

1X

 

Readings for Today

We live in an interesting time. The country seems so divided. The Church seems so divided. It seems that everywhere we turn, there is division. But is this what Jesus meant when he said he came to bring division? Was this the baptism to which he was referring? Hardly. Rather, it was a suggestion that to stand up for what is right, for what the gospel demands, means that sometimes we will face opposition. And yet the first reading emphasizes Saint Paul’s prayer for the Ephesians. How do we know when we are called to division and when we are not? The answer is clear. It is Jesus.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 25, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

He came to bring division?

He came to bring division?
Daily Homilies

 
 

00:00 / 3:08
 

1X

 

Readings for Today

We live in an interesting time. The country seems so divided. The Church seems so divided. It seems that everywhere we turn, there is division. In my priory I sow the seeds of division about best type of ice cream. But is this what Jesus meant when he said he came to bring division? Was this the baptism to which he was referring? Hardly. Rather, it was a suggestion that to stand up for what is right, for what the gospel demands, means that sometimes we will face opposition. And yet the first reading emphasizes Saint Paul’s prayer for the Ephesians. How do we know when we are called to division and when we are not? The answer is clear. It is Jesus.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 25, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

He came to bring division?

He came to bring division?
Daily Homilies

 
 

00:00 / 3:08
 

1X

 

Readings for Today

We live in an interesting time. The country seems so divided. The Church seems so divided. It seems that everywhere we turn, there is division. But is this what Jesus meant when he said he came to bring division? Was this the baptism to which he was referring? Hardly. Rather, it was a suggestion that to stand up for what is right, for what the gospel demands, means that sometimes we will face opposition. And yet the first reading emphasizes Saint Paul’s prayer for the Ephesians. How do we know when we are called to division and when we are not? The answer is clear. It is Jesus.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 25, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

When God seems far away

When God seems far away
Daily Homilies

 
 

00:00 / 2:58
 

1X

 

Readings for Today

Have you ever felt you were without Christ? Probably at some point in our life, we have all felt alone. The current events in the Church can cause that feeling. A difficult illness of a loved one can make us feel alone. The sudden death of someone we love. Or maybe just moments when we struggle with faith. The first reading today describes moments before the community accepted Jesus. But the reading is also clear. Jesus is the source of peace.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 23, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.