Fishing like an expert

Fishing like an expert
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 8:15
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

I remember with great fondness my trip to Newfoundland many years ago. A friend of mine in the seminary was from Newfoundland, and another seminarian (and friend of mine) and I spent time there for a vacation. As part of the vacation, we all joined my friend’s brother, who was partner in a group of fishermen, not unlike Peter and Andrew, and James and John. We were cod fishing. It was an experience I will never forget. Suffice to say, we were a problem that day. Fishing lines get caught twice on the bottom of the ocean (me) to tangled fishing lines (the seminarian who went to Newfoundland with me) probably contributed to a poor catch that day. But it was clear the fishermen who allowed us to join them were good at what they did. It strikes me that it is the same with God. When we allow God to take charge, we receive a big catch of fish. And when we try to do things ourselves, we are not successful.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on September 6, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Spirits in a Material World

Spirits in a Material World
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 3:01
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

If there is a challenge in the current age, it is the belief that what comes from sense knowledge is always the most believable. “Seeing is believing,” we say. Science, despite the ways in which it relies on conjecture, and testing of theories, and “groupthink”, is seen as king. Conversely, the world contrasted with the sensory world, is the spiritual world. It is this world that gives rise to prayer. It is this world that causes us to experience the presence of God. But this world, just as science can be abused, can itself be abused. Manipulative people can become like cult leaders. Spirits must be tested for their goodness. But we must seek the truth in both worlds, for in so doing, we encounter God.

Homily given at Christian College Brothers High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on September 4, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Spirits in a Material World

Spirits in a Material World
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 3:01
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

If there is a challenge in the current age, it is the belief that what comes from sense knowledge is always the most believable. “Seeing is believing,” we say. Science, despite the ways in which it relies on conjecture, and testing of theories, and “groupthink”, is seen as king. Conversely, the world contrasted with the sensory world, is the spiritual world. It is this world that gives rise to prayer. It is this world that causes us to experience the presence of God. But this world, just as science can be abused, can itself be abused. Manipulative people can become like cult leaders. Spirits must be tested for their goodness. But we must seek the truth in both worlds, for in so doing, we encounter God.

Homily given at Christian College Brothers High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on September 4, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Why are we here? God’s Gifts!

Why are we here? God’s Gifts!
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 13:23
 
1X
 
Today was our “Mass of the Holy Spirit” at CBC, and so the readings were not of the day.  The first reading was from the prophet Ezekiel, 36:22a, 26-28. The second reading was from Saint Paul’s Letter to the Romans, 8:26-27. The Gospel Reading was from Saint John, 14:15-17. 

Why do we go to Mass? Why are we here? These questions can really haunt us when things are not going so well. These are questions that young people in particular are asking. With so much brokenness, why does it matter if I am here? What do I do when there is brokenness in my family, in my friends, in the world? Where is God? And why does it matter if I believe in God or not? What happens? At the start of the school year, this is a good time to seek God’s gifts, the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Homily given at Christian College Brothers High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on August 30, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Why are we here? God’s Gifts!

Why are we here? God’s Gifts!
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 13:23
 
1X
 
Today was our “Mass of the Holy Spirit” at CBC, and so the readings were not of the day.  The first reading was from the prophet Ezekiel, 36:22a, 26-28. The second reading was from Saint Paul’s Letter to the Romans, 8:26-27. The Gospel Reading was from Saint John, 14:15-17. 

Why do we go to Mass? Why are we here? These questions can really haunt us when things are not going so well. These are questions that young people in particular are asking. With so much brokenness, why does it matter if I am here? What do I do when there is brokenness in my family, in my friends, in the world? Where is God? And why does it matter if I believe in God or not? What happens? At the start of the school year, this is a good time to seek God’s gifts, the gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Homily given at Christian College Brothers High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on August 30, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Saint Augustine – A reminder of hope

Saint Augustine – A reminder of hope
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 2:52
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

So much of what happens in our lives is about finding what is important. What things are we going to prioritize? In whom will we trust? Which persons will get our time? What endeavors will receive energy and attention? Reading the life of Saint Augustine informs us that he changed completely his priorities. Living a selfish, sense-filled life led to unhappiness. Developing a relationship with God led to fulfillment. If you feel your life is not on track, Saint Augustine might be the reminder that we have reason to hope. God forgives our sins. God stills our heart. God reaches out to us over and over again, allowing us to rest in God.

Saint Augustine – A reminder of hope

Saint Augustine – A reminder of hope
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 2:52
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

So much of what happens in our lives is about finding what is important. What things are we going to prioritize? In whom will we trust? Which persons will get our time? What endeavors will receive energy and attention? Reading the life of Saint Augustine informs us that he changed completely his priorities. Living a selfish, sense-filled life led to unhappiness. Developing a relationship with God led to fulfillment. If you feel your life is not on track, Saint Augustine might be the reminder that we have reason to hope. God forgives our sins. God stills our heart. God reaches out to us over and over again, allowing us to rest in God.

Not who your are, but who you can be

Not who your are, but who you can be

 
 
00:00 / 5:33
 
1X
 
Today’s readings were taken from the Common of Holy Men, for Saint Louis, King of France. In the city of Saint Louis, this is celebrated as a solemnity.

The Austrian psychologist Viktor Frankl challenged the notions in the Freudian school of psychology that human beings were guided either by a will to survive or a will to power. For Frankl, who had survived living in a Concentration Camp, human beings were driven by a will to meaning. That is, they were guided by the quest to find meaning and purpose in there lives. Using the example of flying lessons, he proposed that if we consider human beings as they are, human beings become worse. But, if we consider human beings as they could be, they become better. Just imagine if you considered yourself and others as that ideal person created in God’s image. The world could be changed for the better.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on August 25, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Not who your are, but who you can be

Not who your are, but who you can be
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 5:33
 
1X
 
Today’s readings were taken from the Common of Holy Men, for Saint Louis, King of France. In the city of Saint Louis, this is celebrated as a solemnity.

The Austrian psychologist Viktor Frankl challenged the notions in the Freudian school of psychology that human beings were guided either by a will to survive or a will to power. For Frankl, who had survived living in a Concentration Camp, human beings were driven by a will to meaning. That is, they were guided by the quest to find meaning and purpose in there lives. Using the example of flying lessons, he proposed that if we consider human beings as they are, human beings become worse. But, if we consider human beings as they could be, they become better. Just imagine if you considered yourself and others as that ideal person created in God’s image. The world could be changed for the better.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on August 25, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Prove God’s Holiness

Prove God’s Holiness
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 2:29
 
1X
 

Readings for Today
“I will prove the holiness of my great name.” In an age of doubt and unbelief, God must prove his holiness. For most of us, that has occurred numerous times. But when Ezekiel mentions becoming clean by the sprinkling of clean water, we think of the ultimate proof of God’s holiness: salvation. When we were baptized, we were saved. God does not need to forgive us, extend mercy, or prove anything to us. But he does. And that is because God is holy. So today, seek to prove God’s holiness by living a life that witnesses to the power of the gospel.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri on August 23, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.