No doubt about it: Jesus is Lord

Readings for Today

If I were in the shoes of Saint Thomas, I would have reacted just as he did. I would have doubted. I mean, rising from the dead. How many people can say that have witnessed a death, and seen new life. It is too bad we remember Thomas too often for his doubt. Thomas believed. He shed his life. How did he move from doubt to faith? By a personal encounter with Jesus. Spend some time with Jesus to get to know him better today.

What is broken in your life, that only God can fix?

Readings for Today

Life is a series of cycles.  The sun sets, the sun rises.  We sleep, we wake up.  We eat dead things to stay alive. We feel close to God, we feel removed. The one constant is God. And the mercy and forgiveness of God is more powerful than anything we could imagine. Despite the sins of the people, God is present. God forgives. We engage in acts of penance to help us to see more clearly the presence of God. And at those moments when God is clear, when the presence of God is close, we simply bask in the love God has for each one of us.

Do you believe in God’s mercy and forgiveness?

Today the Church starts readings from the book of Hosea, a wonderful testimony to God’s forgiveness and mercy. You may have heard the phrase, “God is rich in mercy.” But have you considered what that means for you personally? Do you allow yourself to experience that mercy and forgiveness? Do you take the time to find that mercy and forgiveness when God is ready to offer it to you? Can you allow God to change your heart to turn away from sin and to experience the love of God?

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri on July 9, 2018
Image courtesy Pixabay

Not Just for Benedictines: Pray and Work

Readings for Today

To Pray and To Work.  Ora et Labora.  This is the motto of the Benedictines. We celebrate today the founder of the Benedictines: Saint Benedict. Most versions of community life have their roots in the ideas of Saint Benedict. The motto suggests a pattern for life.  The Benedictine Order is a contemplative one, so it is easy to see the value of prayer in what is done. But they also needed to be self-sufficient, and so they worked. So today there is a question for each of us: How is it we sanctify our work? How does our work inform our experience of God?

Homily given at Mercy Hospital, Creve Coeur, Missouri, on July 11, 2018
Picture Courtesy Pixavbay

The Pain for Parents: When a child does not practice the faith

Readings for Today

For some, it is a deeply painful experience where God did not appear to answer a prayer. For some, it is the lack of a compelling reason to believe in God. For others, it is disagreement with one Church teaching or another. These were the three reasons given by a recent study done by Saint Mary’s Press on why some young people are disaffiliated with the Church.  In my ministry, I am not sure there are many more painful ongoing realities than a parent who has adult children who do not practice their faith. Today’s homily invites each of us to enter into the importance of gospel witness.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on July 12, 2018
Image courtesy Pixabay

The Pain for Parents: When a child does not practice the faith

Readings for Today

For some, it is a deeply painful experience where God did not appear to answer a prayer. For some, it is the lack of a compelling reason to believe in God. For others, it is disagreement with one Church teaching or another. These were the three reasons given by a recent study done by Saint Mary’s Press on why some young people are disaffiliated with the Church.  In my ministry, I am not sure there are many more painful ongoing realities than a parent who has adult children who do not practice their faith. Today’s homily invites each of us to enter into the importance of gospel witness.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on July 12, 2018
Image courtesy Pixabay

Not Just for Benedictines: Pray and Work

Readings for Today

To Pray and To Work.  Ora et Labora.  This is the motto of the Benedictines. We celebrate today the founder of the Benedictines: Saint Benedict. Most versions of community life have their roots in the ideas of Saint Benedict. The motto suggests a pattern for life.  The Benedictine Order is a contemplative one, so it is easy to see the value of prayer in what is done. But they also needed to be self-sufficient, and so they worked. So today there is a question for each of us: How is it we sanctify our work? How does our work inform our experience of God?

Homily given at Mercy Hospital, Creve Coeur, Missouri, on July 11, 2018
Picture Courtesy Pixavbay

Do you believe in God’s mercy and forgiveness?

Readings for Today

Today the Church starts readings from the book of Hosea, a wonderful testimony to God’s forgiveness and mercy. You may have heard the phrase, “God is rich in mercy.” But have you considered what that means for you personally? Do you allow yourself to experience that mercy and forgiveness? Do you take the time to find that mercy and forgiveness when God is ready to offer it to you? Can you allow God to change your heart to turn away from sin and to experience the love of God?

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri on July 9, 2018
Image courtesy Pixabay

What is broken in your life, that only God can fix?

Readings for Today

Life is a series of cycles.  The sun sets, the sun rises.  We sleep, we wake up.  We eat dead things to stay alive. We feel close to God, we feel removed. The one constant is God. And the mercy and forgiveness of God is more powerful than anything we could imagine. Despite the sins of the people, God is present. God forgives. We engage in acts of penance to help us to see more clearly the presence of God. And at those moments when God is clear, when the presence of God is close, we simply bask in the love God has for each one of us.

Homily given at St. Dominic Priory, Saint Louis Missouri, on July 7, 2018.
Image courtesy of Pixabay.

No doubt about it: Jesus is Lord

Readings for Today

If I were in the shoes of Saint Thomas, I would have reacted just as he did. I would have doubted. I mean, rising from the dead. How many people can say that have witnessed a death, and seen new life. It is too bad we remember Thomas too often for his doubt. Thomas believed. He shed his life. How did he move from doubt to faith? By a personal encounter with Jesus. Spend some time with Jesus to get to know him better today.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, July 3, 2018.
Image courtesy Pixabay.