Homily: Is Easter simply “Not Lent”?

Homily: Is Easter simply “Not Lent”?
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Sherry Weddell, probably best known as the author of “Forming Intentional Disciples”, posed a question on her forum: Do we see Easter simply as a time known as “Not Lent”? That is to say, does Easter become reduced to that day when we can go back to having what we gave up for Lent? For those who came into the Church at the Easter Vigil, or indeed for all of us, this period of time is known as the mystagogy. This is the time when we attempt to explain to the newly baptized the meaning of the mysteries they now celebrate. The Church recognizes this, which is why the Easter Season is 50 days.

Readings for Today

Homily given on April 23, 2019, at Christian Brothers College High School in Town and Country, Missouri.

Homily: Which snake: Death or Life?

Homily: Which snake: Death or Life?
Daily Homilies

 
 
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There is for many people a fear of snakes. Some suggest this is why the cunning tempter depicted in Genesis is a serpent. Today there are seraph serpents that bite the people and cause death. But this second story about the rebellion of the people ends differently. Rather than resulting on condemnation for all, God uses the seraph serpent as a sign that ultimately things are different. It is not the snake that condemns; it is the God who saves. There is now a new pathway to salvation made clear. The Son of Man will be lifted up. And we can be saved.

Readings for Today

Homily given on April 9, 2019 at Christian Brothers College High School in Town and Country, Missouri.

Homily: Faith is hard

Homily: Faith is hard
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Why did the people of Israel make a golden calf? Why did they, as the responsorial psalm says, exchange their glory? Sometimes we can think they were completely turning their back on their faith. I am not sure that tells the whole story. Just before we come to the section we hear today, we are told that Moses is delayed coming down the mountain. The people become scared. Moses had been their human connection to God. So they make something tangible to take the place of Moses, and to make them feel closer to God. We can be tempted in the same way. Yet, because of the person Jesus, fully human and divine, we really do have all we need.

Readings for Today

Homily: Water gives life

Homily: Water gives life
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Whenever we encounter a story in the bible about water, our minds should immediately be drawn to baptism. Just as the water flowing in the first reading gives physical life to all around it, the water of baptism gives spiritual life to all people who encounter it. The gospel challenges us to see the desire of God to save as something very big, very expansive. Salvation is larger and bigger than a narrow view of what the purpose of a rule is in the bible. Are you willing to say yes to the tremendous and expansive love of God?

Readings for today

Homily given on Tuesday, April 2, 2019, at Christian Brothers College High School in Town and Country, Missouri.

Homily: Christian Life is not a bowl of cherries

Perhaps you have heard the expression, “Life is like a bowl full of cherries.” It is a phrase designed to tell us that life is just simply wonderful, in fact, that it cannot get better. Today’s first reading and gospel tell a different story about the Christian life. Doing the right thing does not always appear to be wonderful. In fact, doing the right thing, living as God wants us to live, is in fact, sometimes, the recipe to things appearing to get worse, not better. Jeremiah is threatened with death for being God’s prophet. Jesus is attacked for liberating the possessed. And we too, in our lives, can find that when we do what is right, we too can be threatened or persecuted. But in all of this, God is always with us. And as long as we know that, we too, like Jeremiah and Jesus, will have great cause for joy.

Readings for Today

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School on Thursday, March 28, 2019, in Town and Country, Missouri.

Homily: Christian Life is not a bowl of cherries

Homily: Christian Life is not a bowl of cherries
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 /
 
1X
 

Perhaps you have heard the expression, “Life is like a bowl full of cherries.” It is a phrase designed to tell us that life is just simply wonderful, in fact, that it cannot get better. Today’s first reading and gospel tell a different story about the Christian life. Doing the right thing does not always appear to be wonderful. In fact, doing the right thing, living as God wants us to live, is in fact, sometimes, the recipe to things appearing to get worse, not better. Jeremiah is threatened with death for being God’s prophet. Jesus is attacked for liberating the possessed. And we too, in our lives, can find that when we do what is right, we too can be threatened or persecuted. But in all of this, God is always with us. And as long as we know that, we too, like Jeremiah and Jesus, will have great cause for joy.

Readings for Today

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School on Thursday, March 28, 2019, in Town and Country, Missouri.

Homily: It will be on the test

For anyone who has taught, especially high school students, there is a question that can come up quite frequently. “Will this be on the test?” While teachers hope to instill a love of learning for its own sake, it is often the case that the reality is quite different. Interestingly, we can also ask a type of question like this when it comes to God. Do I need to forgive my brother every time he sins? The challenge during the season of Lent is to move beyond the minimum to place ourselves into the powerful presence of God.

Readings for Today

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on March 26, 2019.

Homily: Curiosity saves lives (12pm)

There is an old saying, that curiosity killed the cat. I am not sure if that is really true, but I know it was not true in the case of today’s first reading. Moses becomes curious. “I must go over to look at this remarkable sight,
and see why the bush is not burned.” And because he acts on his curiosity, he encounters God. And in this encounter, Moses discovers that his prayers have been answered. Only not in the way he expected. We are about half way through Lent. Ask God to help you use the remedy for sin, to pray, to fast, and to give alms. In so doing, your curiosity might very well lead you closer to God.

Readings for Today

Homily given at Saint Clare of Assisi, Ellisville, Missouri, on March 24, 2019.

Homily: Why does God allow suffering?

Queen Esther is in an interesting spot in her life. On the one hand, her life has been one of blessing. She has become the Queen. This gives here a good life. On the other hand, her Jewish faith has put her in great danger. In some ways the source of her glory is also a great risk. Yet if Esther had done such great things, why is it that she was made to suffer? Why does she find herself in a place where she pours out her heart to God in desperate pleading? Saint Augustine says there are two reasons for our suffering. The first is that we receive punishment as a consequence of our sinfulness. The second is that suffering occurs in our life to keep us from getting too proud, which could be seen as our greatest threat. And by remaining faithful to God in the midst of our suffering, it is then that we also provide an outspoken witness to others about the power of faith.

Readings for Today

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on March 14, 2019.

Homily: The powerful prayer

Today Jesus gives us a lesson in prayer. The prayer, one we say often, is the Our Father. But do we really think about what we are saying? Do with listen carefully with our hearts to consider what the words we say mean for our lives of faith? The Our Father is a powerful lesson on prayer. First, it indicates that prayer is about a relationship with God. We pray together in a privileged way as God allows us to call him Father. Second, we pray that God’s kingdom will come. We may not realize that when we do so, when we pray for the coming of the kingdom we are praying for the fullness of God’s kingdom to come, namely the Second Coming of Jesus and our Final Judgement. Third, the pray implies a profound trust in God that God will take care of each one of us. And lastly, it reminds us of the deep connection between our forgiveness of others and our forgiveness by God.

Readings for Today

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on March 12, 2019.