A Heart Ready for God: Homily for Monday, December 18, 2017

Readings for Today

With all of the revelations of sexual misconduct and harassment, today’s gospel presents us with the courageous man.  The real man.  Saint Joseph, who confronted with unbelievable news that Mary was pregnant — and knowing he was not the father.  And despite this, not wanting to shame Mary.  Not wanting to take out any sort of revenge on Mary. Because he was righteous, Joseph had a heart open to the presence of God. He was ready, so when God did speak to him in a dream, he knew who God was.

Are you ready for God? This is what Christmas is about.  It is not just being ready for an historical event.  It is also about being ready to welcome God into our heart.  Are you ready? Do you strive to be righteous? Do you seek to find the presence of God, and do you know God when he appears?

Resources for Lent: Featured Website of the Day: iBreviary

The iBreviary is your portable breviary. You can use it to pray with the full texts of the Liturgy of the Hours in just five languages. Simply launch the application and all the texts of the day will appear before you.

The texts of the Liturgy of the Hours, are formatted just as they appear in the printed version. Thus the iPad version, thanks to the generous screen, gives one the feeling of holding a book with all the functionality and convenience of an Apple application.

To get the app for iPhone, click here.

To get the app for Google Play, click here.

Resources for Lent: Featured Website of the Day: Stations of the Cross

Aleteia (aleteia.org) is an online publication distributed in seven languages (English, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Arabic and, since July 2016, Polish).

The Aleteia site offers a Christian vision of the world by providing general and religious content that is free from ideological influences. It also publishes specialized digital magazines, including one aimed at a female audience called “For Her.”

With some 200,000 subscribers to our newsletter and more than 1.5 million fans on Facebook, Aleteia reaches more than 9 million unique visitors a month.

Since its launch in 2013, the initiative has been supported by the Foundation for Evangelization through the Media (FEM), which began in Rome in 2011. The Foundation was created to promote the Church’s presence in the media and is currently chaired by H.S.H Prince Nikolaus of Liechtenstein.

In July 2015, the Média-Participations Group became Aleteia’s industrial operator. Média-Participations is a European media group specializing in publishing (with more than 40 publishers), the printing industry (10 magazines), audiovisual production, and websites.

Since then, Aleteia has developed a new editorial strategy focused primarily on information and lifestyle.

Created through the passion and professional expertise of lay Catholics, since its launch Aleteia has been accompanied by the Pontifical Council for Social Communications and the Pontifical Council for the New Evangelization. In communion with the Church’s Magisterium, Aleteia is open to working with the dicasteries of the Holy See, and also collaborates with bishops conferences and religious orders, congregations and communities, some of which are directly involved in the Board of Directors of the Foundation for Evangelization through the Media (FEM).

To go to these stations of the cross, click here.

USCCB Lectio Divina for Second Sunday of Lent

Lectio Divina is a form of meditation rooted in liturgical celebration that dates back to early monastic communities. It involves focused reading of Scripture (lectio), meditation on the Word of God (meditatio), contemplation of the Word and its meaning in one’s life (contemplatio) and ends with prayer (oratio). For this Lent, we will have a Lectio Divina resource for the readings for Ash Wednesday and the Sundays of Lent that can be used by individuals or in group settings.

Second Sunday of Lent Lectio Divina

Segundo Domingo de Cuaresma

Resources for Lent: Featured Website of the Day: Catholic Online

Only Catholic Online, located at www.catholic.org, gives the largest and broadest population of Catholics worldwide easy access to comprehensive, educational and timely information about Catholicism, and provides a range of easy methods to integrate their faith into their daily lives. The mission of Catholic Online (COL) is to accurately represent the Catholic religion: its “past” and present. Today, Catholic Online provides over five million pages of content including the largest online historical and biblical database about the Catholic Church including comprehensive information about over 7,000 Catholic saints and comprehensive online scriptures from all books of the Old and New Testament.

To go to the website, click here.

Resources for Lent: Featured Website of the Day: JimmyAkin.com

From the Website:

Jimmy Akin was born in Texas and grew up nominally Protestant. But at age 20 he experienced a profound conversion to Christ. He planned on becoming a Protestant pastor or seminary professor, and he started an intensive study of the Bible. The thing was, the more he immersed himself in Scripture, the more he found it to support the Catholic faith. Eventually, he had to become Catholic, which he did in 1992. His conversion story, “A Triumph and a Tragedy,” is published in the book Surprised By Truth.

These days, he is a Senior Apologist at Catholic Answers, a member on the Catholic Answers Speakers Bureau, a weekly guest on the global radio program “Catholic Answers Live,” a contributor to Catholic Answers Magazine, and the author of more publications than you can shake a stick at. His books include The Fathers Know Best, Mass Revision, and The Salvation Controversy.

Check out his website.

Resources for Lent: Featured Website of the Day: Lecto Divina

Get Ready for this Sunday

Lectio Divina is a form of meditation rooted in liturgical celebration that dates back to early monastic communities. It involves focused reading of Scripture (lectio), meditation on the Word of God (meditatio), contemplation of the Word and its meaning in one’s life (contemplatio) and ends with prayer (oratio). For this Lent, we will have a Lectio Divina resource for the readings for Ash Wednesday and the Sundays of Lent that can be used by individuals or in group settings.

The US Bishops have put together a lectio divina for this Sunday’s readings.  This lectio divina is available in English and en espanol.