Contemplation and Action: Choosing the Better Part

Contemplation and Action: Choosing the Better Part
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

“It is the Mass that matters most.” In an article about the great “labor priest”, Msgr. George Higgins, this was the quote pulled for the title of the article. Perhaps no Catholic figure of the 20th Century did more for the rights of workers than Msgr. George Higgins. That said, as important as his actions were, it is safe to say his contemplation in the presence of the Lord. He insisted on giving a benediction at Labor meetings. He spent hours in prayer each day. He clearly understood why Jesus said Mary had chosen the better part. Jesus was not suggesting actions did not matter. He was not providing a convenient excuse to do nothing. Rather, he stressed an important truth easily forgotten: action without prayer and contemplation is not better. Martha’s sin was to presume that what she was doing was more important than Mary. We too can fall into this trap. We can believe that even Catholic social activism can be “prayer.” We may meet Christ in others, but we come to know Christ in contemplation.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 9, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.
Posted in Daily Homilies, Daily Homily, Podcasts and tagged , , , , , , , , .

Contemplation and Action – Choosing the better part

Readings for Today

“It is the Mass that matters most.” In an article about the great “labor priest”, Msgr. George Higgins, this was the quote pulled for the title of the article. Perhaps no Catholic figure of the 20th Century did more for the rights of workers than Msgr. George Higgins. That said, as important as his actions were, it is safe to say his contemplation in the presence of the Lord. He insisted on giving a benediction at Labor meetings. He spent hours in prayer each day. He clearly understood why Jesus said Mary had chosen the better part. Jesus was not suggesting actions did not matter. He was not providing a convenient excuse to do nothing. Rather, he stressed an important truth easily forgotten: action without prayer and contemplation is not better. Martha’s sin was to presume that what she was doing was more important than Mary. We too can fall into this trap. We can believe that even Catholic social activism can be “prayer.” We may meet Christ in others, but we come to know Christ in contemplation.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 9, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.
Posted in Daily Homilies, Daily Homily, Podcasts and tagged , , , , , , , .