Water and blood. Baptism and Eucharist. Homily for Saturday, January 6, 2018

Water and blood. Baptism and Eucharist. Homily for Saturday, January 6, 2018
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

Water and Blood.  Baptism and Eucharist. Words in the bible often refer to something other than the obvious.  Today is such an example.  Water is part of both readings.  Whenever we see or read about water, the first thought should be baptism. This is true whether we read about New Testament letters, like today, or stories from the Old Testament.  The flood in the book of Genesis points to baptism.  The faithful, those who trust in God, are saved.

Today is just such an example.  The readings remind us of the very important difference between John’s baptism and the baptism of Jesus. John’s baptism points to human effort. Jesus’ baptism points to divine salvation. The Incarnation of Jesus is not simply a nice Christmas set.  Rather, it is the miracle of God’s becoming human.  And, because Jesus is both human and divine, the sacraments lead to salvation.

Reality: Homily for the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ, June 18, 2017

Reality: Homily for the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ, June 18, 2017
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
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To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

The readings today take great pains to reinforce a particularly important type of reality.  When we think of real, we often think, or many people think, of the scientific world, based upon observation and fact.  And while this is a good and noble way to learn about truth, the way things are, it is not the only way.  There is another type of reality, a way of seeing that equally seeks the truth.  And often these truths are the higher level truths, because they are the truths that do not rest on human reason (though they are reasonable) but upon the spiritual revelation of God which is always real and true, and will always be real and true.

What we celebrate today is just such a truth.  There is with the Eucharist what we see — the host and the wine — and what is really and truly present, the Body and Blood of Christ.  To drive home this point, the gospel of John uses really down to earth terms.  Real terms.  Which causes the listeners to be quite perplexed as to what Jesus means.  John uses the word flesh, not just a symbol of the flesh, or a sign, or a recreation, but rather something real and true.  So today, receive Jesus, body and blood, soul and divinity, at Mass.