Homily: The powerful prayer

Today Jesus gives us a lesson in prayer. The prayer, one we say often, is the Our Father. But do we really think about what we are saying? Do with listen carefully with our hearts to consider what the words we say mean for our lives of faith? The Our Father is a powerful lesson on prayer. First, it indicates that prayer is about a relationship with God. We pray together in a privileged way as God allows us to call him Father. Second, we pray that God’s kingdom will come. We may not realize that when we do so, when we pray for the coming of the kingdom we are praying for the fullness of God’s kingdom to come, namely the Second Coming of Jesus and our Final Judgement. Third, the pray implies a profound trust in God that God will take care of each one of us. And lastly, it reminds us of the deep connection between our forgiveness of others and our forgiveness by God.

Readings for Today

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on March 12, 2019.

Homily: The Powerful Prayer

Homily: The Powerful Prayer
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Today Jesus gives us a lesson in prayer. The prayer, one we say often, is the Our Father. But do we really think about what we are saying? Do with listen carefully with our hearts to consider what the words we say mean for our lives of faith? The Our Father is a powerful lesson on prayer. First, it indicates that prayer is about a relationship with God. We pray together in a privileged way as God allows us to call him Father. Second, we pray that God’s kingdom will come. We may not realize that when we do so, when we pray for the coming of the kingdom we are praying for the fullness of God’s kingdom to come, namely the Second Coming of Jesus and our Final Judgement. Third, the pray implies a profound trust in God that God will take care of each one of us. And lastly, it reminds us of the deep connection between our forgiveness of others and our forgiveness by God.

Readings for Today

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on March 26, 2019.

A Dominican Season

Readings for Today

At the risk of irritating other religious orders, I think Advent is really a Dominican season. The readings today remind us of the spiritual cycle of a preacher. First, there is the attention to the presence of God in contemplation. We do not control what happens in contemplation, God does. I think this is why it is sometimes difficult. What do we do next? With whatever fruits God wishes to give us, we share those with others in our sacred preaching. Have a holy Advent.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on December 15, 2018.

A Dominican Season

A Dominican Season
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

At the risk of irritating other religious orders, I think Advent is really a Dominican season. The readings today remind us of the spiritual cycle of a preacher. First, there is the attention to the presence of God in contemplation. We do not control what happens in contemplation, God does. I think this is why it is sometimes difficult. What do we do next? With whatever fruits God wishes to give us, we share those with others in our sacred preaching. Have a holy Advent.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on December 15, 2018.

Contemplation and Action: Choosing the Better Part

Contemplation and Action: Choosing the Better Part
Daily Homilies

 
 

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Readings for Today

“It is the Mass that matters most.” In an article about the great “labor priest”, Msgr. George Higgins, this was the quote pulled for the title of the article. Perhaps no Catholic figure of the 20th Century did more for the rights of workers than Msgr. George Higgins. That said, as important as his actions were, it is safe to say his contemplation in the presence of the Lord. He insisted on giving a benediction at Labor meetings. He spent hours in prayer each day. He clearly understood why Jesus said Mary had chosen the better part. Jesus was not suggesting actions did not matter. He was not providing a convenient excuse to do nothing. Rather, he stressed an important truth easily forgotten: action without prayer and contemplation is not better. Martha’s sin was to presume that what she was doing was more important than Mary. We too can fall into this trap. We can believe that even Catholic social activism can be “prayer.” We may meet Christ in others, but we come to know Christ in contemplation.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 9, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Contemplation and Action – Choosing the better part

Readings for Today

“It is the Mass that matters most.” In an article about the great “labor priest”, Msgr. George Higgins, this was the quote pulled for the title of the article. Perhaps no Catholic figure of the 20th Century did more for the rights of workers than Msgr. George Higgins. That said, as important as his actions were, it is safe to say his contemplation in the presence of the Lord. He insisted on giving a benediction at Labor meetings. He spent hours in prayer each day. He clearly understood why Jesus said Mary had chosen the better part. Jesus was not suggesting actions did not matter. He was not providing a convenient excuse to do nothing. Rather, he stressed an important truth easily forgotten: action without prayer and contemplation is not better. Martha’s sin was to presume that what she was doing was more important than Mary. We too can fall into this trap. We can believe that even Catholic social activism can be “prayer.” We may meet Christ in others, but we come to know Christ in contemplation.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 9, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Treasuring things in your heart: Homily for Monday, Janaury 1, 2018

Treasuring things in your heart: Homily for Monday, Janaury 1, 2018
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Readings for Today

This might not be the time of year you feel like slowing down.  It may not be the time of year you can slow down.  But today’s gospel is an invitation to contemplation. As we consider the role and person of Mary, Mother of God, we are given the model of someone with a contemplative heart.  And this contemplative heart allows Mary to overcome some very difficult things.

In our lives, too, things can be hard.  We can find that so much activity is part of life. It can seem there is no time to think. But is this really true? What if we imitated Mary and treasured what happens in our hearts? What if we made time for prayer and contemplation in our lives? Try to do so during this year.