Why believe in God?: Homily for Thursday, October 12, 2017

Readings for Today

It seems like there has been one disaster after another.  Hurricanes. Floods. Earthquakes. Shootings. Fires. At some point, even a reasonable person might begin to ask what it all means. There can be in us a feeling that might give into despair.  And for me, that is just from someone who has not personally experienced any of these disasters but has only heard their harrowing stories.

The first reading is filled with despair.  There is no longer a hope in God because it seems like there is no good reason to believe. And yet the gospel reminds us of the value of perseverance.  Even when the homeowner does not feel like getting out of bed at night to help his neighbor, persistence causes him to do so. And when we can remain persistent in prayer, we too can become more aware of God’s grace.

Despair to Hope: Homily for Tuesday, September 19, 2017

To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for today

Today we encounter a woman who is understandably in the depths of despair.  Her son is dead, and to make matters worse, she is a widow.  This parent must face the death of her son alone. Can there be any greater heartache to a parent than to lose their child? I cannot think of one. I bet most parents cannot think of one, either.

And yet, in the height of her sadness and loss, she encounters Jesus.  And as Jesus always does, Jesus brings life.  Sometimes in moments like today’s gospel, he does so in an easily observable way.  At other times, it is in the challenge that might mean initial sadness before receiving life.  Regardless, today we are all reminded that Jesus is the author and source of life.  Let Jesus raise life in you.

Homily for Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Readings for Today

Why did he do it?  Why is it that Judas handed Jesus over for 30 pieces of silver?  Monday’s gospel suggests that it was due to greed.  “Then Judas the Iscariot, one of his disciples, and the one who would betray him, said, “Why was this oil not sold for three hundred days’ wages and given to the poor?”  He said this not because he cared about the poor but because he was a thief and held the money bag and used to steal the contributions.

There are other times when we might consider the arguments of the apostles over such things as to which one of them was the greatest.  Perhaps Judas was envious, and was taking out this envy by handing Jesus over to his death.

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