God’s Unique Expression to you

God’s Unique Expression to you
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

Here is a good reminder. Every person is called by God. Every person has a unique call by God. This call from God is at times, difficult, but leads to eternal happiness if answered. Today’s gospel recounts how Jesus chose the apostles. As such, it reminds us of our own personal call to be what God has chosen us to be. The choice of Jesus only occurs after prayer. He prays all night before making his choice. In so doing, we have a model of how to make our own choices.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on September 11, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

God’s Unique Expression to you

God’s Unique Expression to you
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 2:47
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

Here is a good reminder. Every person is called by God. Every person has a unique call by God. This call from God is at times, difficult, but leads to eternal happiness if answered. Today’s gospel recounts how Jesus chose the apostles. As such, it reminds us of our own personal call to be what God has chosen us to be. The choice of Jesus only occurs after prayer. He prays all night before making his choice. In so doing, we have a model of how to make our own choices.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on September 11, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Fishing like an expert

Fishing like an expert
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

I remember with great fondness my trip to Newfoundland many years ago. A friend of mine in the seminary was from Newfoundland, and another seminarian (and friend of mine) and I spent time there for a vacation. As part of the vacation, we all joined my friend’s brother, who was partner in a group of fishermen, not unlike Peter and Andrew, and James and John. We were cod fishing. It was an experience I will never forget. Suffice to say, we were a problem that day. Fishing lines get caught twice on the bottom of the ocean (me) to tangled fishing lines (the seminarian who went to Newfoundland with me) probably contributed to a poor catch that day. But it was clear the fishermen who allowed us to join them were good at what they did. It strikes me that it is the same with God. When we allow God to take charge, we receive a big catch of fish. And when we try to do things ourselves, we are not successful.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on September 6, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

The most important gift is holiness

The most important gift is holiness
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

Today we celebrate Saint John Vianney, who is the patron saint of priests. Much goes into the training of a priest. There are theological studies, spiritual direction and other formation programs to strengthen the skills a priest needs for pastoral ministry. But Saint John Vianney provides a helpful insight into the priesthood. Most important is holiness. This is not to say theological studies are not important, or that there should be no pastoral training. What it is to say is that all of this is for not if it does not lead to holiness. Our purpose is holiness. We answer the call to holiness in our personal lives, and witness this holiness so others may answer God’s call.  So today, be holy as the Lord, your God is holy.

The most important gift is holiness

The most important gift is holiness
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 4:06
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

Today we celebrate Saint John Vianney, who is the patron saint of priests. Much goes into the training of a priest. There are theological studies, spiritual direction and other formation programs to strengthen the skills a priest needs for pastoral ministry. But Saint John Vianney provides a helpful insight into the priesthood. Most important is holiness. This is not to say theological studies are not important, or that there should be no pastoral training. What it is to say is that all of this is for not if it does not lead to holiness. Our purpose is holiness. We answer the call to holiness in our personal lives, and witness this holiness so others may answer God’s call.  So today, be holy as the Lord, your God is holy.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on August 4, 2018
Photo courtesy Pixabay.

There’s nothing more important than following Jesus

Readings for Today

(Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, MO, on July 2, 2018.)

When I was writing my dissertation, I had to leave my room. If I stayed at home, there were simply too many distractions. Everywhere I looked there was a chance I could focus on anything but my dissertation. So too, we can become distracted in the faith. We can seek out anything but what God is asking of us. We can make excuses for not helping others. We can seem too busy for prayer. But the message from the gospel is clear: there is nothing more important than following Jesus.

It ends where it began. With Discipleship: Homily for the Feast of Saint Andrew, Apostle

Readings for Today

As we come to the end of the liturgical year, we end right where we began. Discipleship. This story has been used by authors like Sherry Weddell as the illustration of intentional discipleship. Andrew and Simon drop their nets and leave their old way of life. While they do not fully know where that will lead, they do know it will always be with Jesus.  They have turned over their lives to follow, and to emulate, this person of Jesus.

What do you make of your state of discipleship? Are you closer to Jesus, or are you further away? Do you know Jesus more clearly, or are you more distant in what you know? The good news is that even after his decision to become an intentional disciple, Andrew was not perfect.  Andrew did not always understand Jesus, and sometimes he made Jesus angry. As you reflect back upon this past year, where do you need Jesus in your life?

It ain’t all candy and roses: Homily for Wednesday, November 29, 2017

It ain’t all candy and roses: Homily for Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

Sometimes the Christian life is presented in such a way as to make it seem easy. Jesus is the kind teddy bear, and not only does he never demand anything of us, he makes all things feel good. While this type of feel good religion is tempting, Jesus never embraced such a religion. Persecution. Division. Not Peace. Conflict. Even Death. The life of one who follows the gospel is not automatically good. In fact, some would call the age we live in today the age of the martyrs, as Christians are being persecuted and killed all over the world.

The good news is that for people who have total trust in Jesus, like the widow a couple of days ago, the grace and love of God can see them through anything. Jesus mentions the difficulties so that we do not go into intentional discipleship blindly. Rather, he wants us to know that while it will not always be easy, we will also face whatever comes in the power of this relationship with Jesus.

Becoming Beautiful Grapes: Homily for Sunday, October 8, 2017

Becoming Beautiful Grapes: Homily for Sunday, October 8, 2017
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
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Readings for Today

My aunt and uncle had a vineyard behind their house.  It was not very big, but it produced tasty grapes.  I really liked them.  And while my childhood memory may not be great, I do not remember sour grapes. To be clear, there was care for the grapes that I did not see.  They required care.  They needed to be tended to in order to be tasty.

I cannot imagine what would have happened if in spite of the hard work there were no grapes to be had.  Or, worse, if despite hard work the grapes were sour. And yet that is what we hear in the readings.  Despite the loving self-gift of Jesus to save us, we do not always bear good fruit. We turn away.  We disrupt. And sometimes even, we kill.  The call today is to be the disciple that does not disrupt, but bears fruit.

Rosary as Contemplation: Homily for Saturday, October 7, 2017

Rosary as Contemplation: Homily for Saturday, October 7, 2017
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

This feast has its roots in a battle.  As the story goes, the praying of the rosary led to victory.  That is why the original name of this day was Our Lady of Victory.  But as wonderful as the title is, I prefer the name the celebration has today: Our Lady of the Rosary.  Why?

The biggest reason is the way in which the rosary itself gets highlighted.  The rosary is such a powerful prayer of contemplation.  While it is true the victory of God is constant in the contemplation of the rosary, the connection to the events of our salvation, and to Jesus, seems clearer when compared to the rosary.

The rosary is the pathway to contemplation.  In its truest form, the rosary leads us to Jesus.  We reflect on his life, death and resurrection. The rosary also leads to discipleship. Just as the disciples responded to Jesus, Mary’s responded perfectly to God.  She too was sent.  She too was a devout follower of God.  Her constant yes is worthy of our imitation.