A Dominican Season

Readings for Today

At the risk of irritating other religious orders, I think Advent is really a Dominican season. The readings today remind us of the spiritual cycle of a preacher. First, there is the attention to the presence of God in contemplation. We do not control what happens in contemplation, God does. I think this is why it is sometimes difficult. What do we do next? With whatever fruits God wishes to give us, we share those with others in our sacred preaching. Have a holy Advent.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on December 15, 2018.

A Dominican Season

A Dominican Season
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

At the risk of irritating other religious orders, I think Advent is really a Dominican season. The readings today remind us of the spiritual cycle of a preacher. First, there is the attention to the presence of God in contemplation. We do not control what happens in contemplation, God does. I think this is why it is sometimes difficult. What do we do next? With whatever fruits God wishes to give us, we share those with others in our sacred preaching. Have a holy Advent.

Homily given at Saint Dominic Priory, Saint Louis, Missouri, on December 15, 2018.

Are you all in?

Are you all in?
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Readings for Today

Are you all in? That is an interesting expression to describe when we hold nothing back. While it is often used in an athletic context, it can also mean any part of our lives where we need to give our all to something. 

In both readings, it is the widow who is the hero of the story. Why is this? Because both the widow who encounters Elijah, and the widow in the gospel who gives from her want, each of them is completely in with God. The trust each shows to God is total.

What about you and me? All in? Or is it the case the trust shown is “surplus” trust in God? Will you go wherever God leads? Say yes. Go all in.

Homily given at Saint Monica Parish, Creve Coeur, Missouri, on November 10, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.


Are you all in?

Are you all in?
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 11:01
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

Are you all in? That is an interesting expression to describe when we hold nothing back. While it is often used in an athletic context, it can also mean any part of our lives where we need to give our all to something. 

In both readings, it is the widow who is the hero of the story. Why is this? Because both the widow who encounters Elijah, and the widow in the gospel who gives from her want, each of them is completely in with God. The trust each shows to God is total.

What about you and me? All in? Or is it the case the trust shown is “surplus” trust in God? Will you go wherever God leads? Say yes. Go all in.

Homily given at Saint Monica Parish, Creve Coeur, Missouri, on November 10, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.


Seeking Silence: Homily for Sunday, August 13, 2017

Seeking Silence: Homily for Sunday, August 13, 2017
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To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

Today’s first reading is one of my favorite readings.  Despite all of the marvelous things God has done, people’s hearts are not being changed.  In fact, it seems the more Elijah shows God’s power, the worse it gets for him. He wants to die. But in an ever so silent way, God comes to Elijah. But not dramatically, as in an earthquake, fire or mighty wind, but in a tiny whispering sound.

It can be so hard today to find a tiny whispering sound.  We are so distracted.  There is so much noise around us.  Cell phones, tablets, computers, and more.  We are constantly bombarded with outside information and distractions.  And while there is good to these devices, there is also a challenge.  Do they bring us closer to God, or do they drive God away?

Seeing: Homily for the Transfiguration, August 6, 2017

Seeing: Homily for the Transfiguration, August 6, 2017
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To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

There is a need to see the presence of God today.  Even a quick glance shows the face of evil around us.  Life is hard.  It is not only about evil actions of others.  There are illnesses, natural disasters, and other events that often are not connected to others.  Children get terminal illnesses and die.  People we love and care about suffer.  Sometimes we just want to scream, “Where are you God?”

Today we celebrate God’s answer.  I am right here.  My presence is everywhere.  My promise is sure.  Yet how is it we see this presence?  How is it that we know that God is near? Today’s reading tells about one of those experiences that are reserved for Peter, James and John.  Does Jesus call you away for a special experience of his presence? Do you put yourselves in places where the opportunity to see God is near?  Open your heart to God in your life, so you may see his glorious presence.

Homily for Saturday, December 13, 2014

Readings for Today

Elijah had a rather interesting prophetic career. He had successes  and failures, he felt strongly the presence of God and found him to be distant, and had a life filled with ups and downs. His life was filled with the miraculous, whether it was defeating the numerous prophets of Baal or being taken up into heaven. He wanted to die, and he kept a widow and her son from dying from famine. Over time, his return was associated with the coming of the Messiah. Just as it was a magnificent whirlwind of fire that took up Elijah, so too  his return would be a sign of the whirlwind of God’s Messiah, His Son, would arrive soon.

In many ways, that John the Baptist is identified as Elijah should not come as a surprise. He is steeped in signs from the Old Testament. He goes to the desert (sign of reform and the quest for God), eats locusts (sign of plague) and wild honey (sign of the promised land), has success and is ultimately killed. His preaching not only tills the soil for finding God’s presence in their daily lives, but also prepares their hearts for the coming of Jesus. He knows who he is, and has no delusions of grandeur.

Just as Elijah and John the Baptist were faithful to the call to prepare the way of the Lord, so to0 to we find ourselves with the same message. We are  also charged with pointing out the presence of God wherever we see it. Like John the Baptist, we too are called to be such a witness that others can more clearly see the presence of God in their lives. But if our words are to have meaning, they need to be backed by the power of our actions.

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Homily for Saturday, June 14, 2014

Readings for Today

Notice how often in the Scriptures those who are sent forth are often the vehicles of God to others?  Paul seeks out Timothy, Moses had Aaron, and Jesus seeks out disciples.  This pattern continues in the first reading when Elijah seeks out Elisha, who is going about his daily routine.  I wonder what it was in that encounter that led to the call of Elisha?  Because much like the Apostles Peter, Andrew, James and John, the response of Elisha is dramatic.  He destroys the things of his former way of life to follow Elijah, and ultimately God, unreservedly.

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Homily for Friday, June 13, 2014

Readings for Today

I think everyone has certain readings that become favorites.  We hear them, and even if we find we cannot completely apply them in our lives, these readings become familiar stops to help us to grow in our spirituality and in our relationship with God.  The story of Elijah provides some familiar favorites for me.

Elijah has an interesting life as a prophet.  He challenges the 450 prophets of Baal, to see which God can light the fire, and because of God’s mighty deeds, wins.  Yet, the miraculous and unbelievable occurrence does not lead to greater faith on the part of the people, but rather a desire to kill Elijah.   And so he becomes quite depressed, wanting to die.

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Homily for Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Readings for Today

Salt.  Light.  Bread.  Water. As Catholics, we like the tangible.  And the powerful belief we hold is that God can become real in these types of ordinary things.  And perhaps because of this, some find it hard to believe.  Our lives seem too ordinary.  Great things can be explained away as a coincidence.  Relying only on what we see can appear to be quite safe and secure.

Jesus calls his disciples to be noticed.  Putting salt on things gets noticed.  Being light gets noticed.  We are called to be noticed, by standing up for our faith, by witnessing to the faith by the actions we take.  This means that we need the grace so that we are not afraid to speak what we believe, and live our faith.  This does not mean we need to be obnoxious about it, but if we believe we have found something life-changing, it means we should want to share this with others.

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