Take me now — No, eat! (11:00am)

Take me now — No, eat! (11:00am)
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Readings for Today

Poor Elijah. He is at the end of his rope. And he has good reason. Despite his faithfulness to God, the people reject him. He can do no more. He wants to die. We have probably felt something like this. Perhaps we feel it in a medical diagnosis. Perhaps there are problems with our spouse. Maybe we feel the demands of work are beyond us. Maybe we study for a test only to fail. Perhaps it is a case where I argue with my parents. Whatever, we can come to the end of our rope. That is where Jesus comes to us. When we are hungry and reach out to him. Go to Mass. Eat the bread of life. Be filled.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri on August 12, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Take me now — No, eat! (9:00am)

Take me now — No, eat! (9:00am)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 13:45
 
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Readings for Today

Poor Elijah. He is at the end of his rope. And he has good reason. Despite his faithfulness to God, the people reject him. He can do no more. He wants to die. We have probably felt something like this. Perhaps we feel it in a medical diagnosis. Perhaps there are problems with our spouse. Maybe we feel the demands of work are beyond us. Maybe we study for a test only to fail. Perhaps it is a case where I argue with my parents. Whatever, we can come to the end of our rope. That is where Jesus comes to us. When we are hungry and reach out to him. Go to Mass. Eat the bread of life. Be filled.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri on August 12, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Take me now — No, eat! (11:00am)

Take me now — No, eat! (11:00am)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 13:45
 
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Readings for Today
Poor Elijah. He is at the end of his rope. And he has good reason. Despite his faithfulness to God, the people reject him. He can do no more. He wants to die. We have probably felt something like this. Perhaps we feel it in a medical diagnosis. Perhaps there are problems with our spouse. Maybe we feel the demands of work are beyond us. Maybe we study for a test only to fail. Perhaps it is a case where I argue with my parents. Whatever, we can come to the end of our rope. That is where Jesus comes to us. When we are hungry and reach out to him. Go to Mass. Eat the bread of life. Be filled.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri on August 12, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Take me now — No, eat! (9:00am)

Take me now — No, eat! (9:00am)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 13:45
 
1X
 

Readings for Today
Poor Elijah. He is at the end of his rope. And he has good reason. Despite his faithfulness to God, the people reject him. He can do no more. He wants to die. We have probably felt something like this. Perhaps we feel it in a medical diagnosis. Perhaps there are problems with our spouse. Maybe we feel the demands of work are beyond us. Maybe we study for a test only to fail. Perhaps it is a case where I argue with my parents. Whatever, we can come to the end of our rope. That is where Jesus comes to us. When we are hungry and reach out to him. Go to Mass. Eat the bread of life. Be filled.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri on August 12, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Take me now — No, eat! (5:00pm)

Take me now — No, eat! (5:00pm)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 13:45
 
1X
 

Readings for Today
Poor Elijah. He is at the end of his rope. And he has good reason. Despite his faithfulness to God, the people reject him. He can do no more. He wants to die. We have probably felt something like this. Perhaps we feel it in a medical diagnosis. Perhaps there are problems with our spouse. Maybe we feel the demands of work are beyond us. Maybe we study for a test only to fail. Perhaps it is a case where I argue with my parents. Whatever, we can come to the end of our rope. That is where Jesus comes to us. When we are hungry and reach out to him. Go to Mass. Eat the bread of life. Be filled.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri on August 11, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Take me now — No, eat!

Take me now — No, eat!
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 13:45
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

Poor Elijah. He is at the end of his rope. And he has good reason. Despite his faithfulness to God, the people reject him. He can do no more. He wants to die. We have probably felt something like this. Perhaps we feel it in a medical diagnosis. Perhaps there are problems with our spouse. Maybe we feel the demands of work are beyond us. Maybe we study for a test only to fail. Perhaps it is a case where I argue with my parents. Whatever, we can come to the end of our rope. That is where Jesus comes to us. When we are hungry and reach out to him. Go to Mass. Eat the bread of life. Be filled.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri on August 11, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Hungry? God has food: Homily for Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Hungry? God has food: Homily for Wednesday, December 6, 2017
Daily Homilies

 
 
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Readings for Today

Today’s readings made me hungry.  Isaiah discusses rich foods and choice wines.  Jesus discusses feeding the great multitudes that followed him. But all this talk about food is not accidental.  We can easily see food is a comfortable thing.  When we are hungry, food fills. But what do you want to fill up with? For it is not just an empty stomach that can make us hungry, but also an empty soul.

And when our soul is empty, it is not as easy to fill it ourselves. We can try.  We can look to eating too much, drinking too much, working too hard, or seeking unhealthy physical comforts in something like pornography.  But the soul can only really be filled by Jesus. It is only when we acknowledge our hunger for something more, and invite Jesus into our lives that we get full.  What are you spiritually hungry for? Ask Jesus for spiritual food.  It fills.

Homily for Christmas 2014

Readings for the Vigil Mass

Readings for the Mass at Night

Readings for Mass at Dawn

Readings for Mass During the Day

Over these past few weeks, I have had the powerful realization that I am not alone. My father died a little more than a week ago. Throughout his most recent illness, the result of a fall where he broke both hips, I spent a lot of time in a hospital and in a nursing home. Interestingly, these two locations can be places of loneliness and connection. I witnessed both. But I experienced connection. It was because I was not alone. First, and most important, I felt repeatedly the presence of God. But beyond that, my mother and brother were beside me. We were together. Second, thanks to my connection to the Dominicans in the Central Province, my relatives, and those with whom I am connected on Facebook, I felt a tremendous sense of being to connected to many people from aspects of my life.

But in the midst of these days I saw many who appeared to be alone. This was not a result of care. My father received amazing care. But as my father had dementia, there were many spouses visiting persons they loved who did not know who they were. My father over the past few years had his mind taken from him little by little. At the end of his life, I think he thought I was one of the nurses. Thinking not only about my father, as well as the others in the various care facilities, caused me to wonder what someone with dementia really felt and experienced.  I thought about a woman whose husband had been in the care facility for years. He did not recognize him. Even so, moved by what seemed to me to be loving care, she visited him every day for hours a day. I wonder if she felt alone in the midst of this horrible illness.

During the holidays, like Christmas, while for many are times when family and loved ones can make us feel connected, for others it can be a time of profound loneliness. As beautiful as Norman Rockwell Christmas paintings can be, they do not reflect for all the reality of the season. How is it we attempt to cope with this loneliness? There are a variety of ways. For some, it is the desire to get and to purchase lots and lots of material things in an attempt to fill up what we are missing. For some, it can be a time where there is a lot of drinking to numb the pain.

But the profound mystery we celebrate this Christmas is the reality we are not alone. God is with us. We have learned that in the name we sometimes us to refer to Jesus, “God with us.” And what can be more powerful than knowing that really, we are never alone. God is with us. For God could not bear for us to be alone, the result of sin. Sin breaks our relationships. Sin causes the connections we desire to form due to our social nature to be destroyed.

God desires nothing more than giving us every chance to experience salvation. Knowledge we are not alone helps us to face just about anything. While the awareness I was not alone did not keep my father from dying, it did remind me in a powerful way that life is beyond simply what I can see. I learned I was connected in ways I was not even aware of before my father’s death.

It can be easy in our world to question whether God exists, because there seems to be so much disconnection. There is such brutal and unbelievable suffering and death in places like Syria and Iraq. There are too many who go without the basics in life. Each day people starve not because we cannot produce enough food, but because we do not share it. The possibility of a person coming into the United States might have Ebola causes tremendous panic, even though we here can live with the reality that too many in the world have little or no health care structure at all.

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Homily for Sunday, August 3, 2014

Readings for Today

It can be quite difficult when we spend even a little bit of time considering the news. There simply is so much bad news going on in our world right now. In fact it can seem almost overwhelming. Will things ever get better? Will we ever make progress against those problems that have been with us since the beginning of time? Will we be able to change behaviors that cause people to go without even the basic necessities of life? Will we be able to change those attitudes that are responsible for the deep violence we see in so many parts of our world?

The current circumstances in our world can make us feel quite helpless. These questions have not even considered those difficult circumstances that many of us face our own personal lives. We can rightly wonder where God is in the midst of all of this.  The temptation in the Western world is to sit down and work out those types of actions that we can take, programs that we can create to tackle these difficult problems.

In fact, even a cursory look at recent history suggests that such an approach will, and, also leads almost always, to our inability to solve the long-standing problems. And so perhaps today’s readings are challenging us to look at the situation that we face in our world in different ways. Because perhaps the problem lies in the very reality that we try to do everything ourselves.

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Homily for Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Readings for Today

From time to time I hear the words of a priest or bishop discussing how rarely people are able to go to Mass and receive the Eucharist. I have heard Dominicans share the same thing. In some parts of the world, people only area able to get to Mass a few times a year, if that. When people are able to get to Mass, it is not simply a one hour event. No, it can last for a few hours.
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