Condemnation or Forgiveness: Don’t be stupid

Condemnation or Forgiveness: Don’t be stupid
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 2:49
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

While he could be, Saint Paul was not always known for gentleness. He concurred in the act of killing. He was bold in his speech. When he was sent off to Tarsus early after his conversion, the whole Church was at peace. And so, it should not come as a surprise that he calls the Galatians stupid. And, not just once, he does so twice. What is the cause of this outburst from Saint Paul? The Galatians wanted to go back to following the letter of the law, which leads to condemnation, rather than following Jesus, whose forgiveness and love can lead to eternal life. Do you follow Jesus and make yourself available for his love and mercy? Or, do you focus only on the letter of the law rules, and see only how you break them? Follow Jesus.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 11, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Condemnation or Forgiveness: Don’t be stupid

Readings for Today

While he could be, Saint Paul was not always known for gentleness. He concurred in the act of killing. He was bold in his speech. When he was sent off to Tarsus early after his conversion, the whole Church was at peace. And so, it should not come as a surprise that he calls the Galatians stupid. And, not just once, he does so twice. What is the cause of this outburst from Saint Paul? The Galatians wanted to go back to following the letter of the law, which leads to condemnation, rather than following Jesus, whose forgiveness and love can lead to eternal life. Do you follow Jesus and make yourself available for his love and mercy? Or, do you focus only on the letter of the law rules, and see only how you break them? Follow Jesus.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on October 11, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Be on Team Jesus (11:30)

Be on Team Jesus (11:30)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 9:41
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

It is easy to get a rise in Saint Louis. Simply mention the Cubs. Or the Red Sox. Or the Patriots. In the United States, emotions are easy to see in more important ways too. Judge Kavanaugh. Dr. Blasey. Donald Trump. Hillary Clinton. Republicans. Democrats. Pope Benedict. Pope Francis. We like to be on one team, and call the other team evil. Or stupid. Or crazy. But is there really any other team more important than being on Team Jesus?

Homily given at Saints Joachim and Ann, St. Charles, Missouri, on September 30, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Be on Team Jesus (9:30)

Be on Team Jesus (9:30)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 9:41
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

It is easy to get a rise in Saint Louis. Simply mention the Cubs. Or the Red Sox. Or the Patriots. In the United States, emotions are easy to see in more important ways too. Judge Kavanaugh. Dr. Blasey. Donald Trump. Hillary Clinton. Republicans. Democrats. Pope Benedict. Pope Francis. We like to be on one team, and call the other team evil. Or stupid. Or crazy. But is there really any other team more important than being on Team Jesus?

Homily given at Saints Joachim and Ann, St. Charles, Missouri, on September 30, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Be on Team Jesus (11:30)

Be on Team Jesus (11:30)
Sunday Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 10:47
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

It is easy to get a rise in Saint Louis. Simply mention the Cubs. Or the Red Sox. Or the Patriots. In the United States, emotions are easy to see in more important ways too. Judge Kavanaugh. Dr. Blasey. Donald Trump. Hillary Clinton. Republicans. Democrats. Pope Benedict. Pope Francis. We like to be on one team, and call the other team evil. Or stupid. Or crazy. But is there really any other team more important than being on Team Jesus?

Homily given at Saints Joachim and Ann, St. Charles, Missouri, on September 30, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Be on Team Jesus (9:30)

Readings for Today

It is easy to get a rise in Saint Louis. Simply mention the Cubs. Or the Red Sox. Or the Patriots. In the United States, emotions are easy to see in more important ways too. Judge Kavanaugh. Dr. Blasey. Donald Trump. Hillary Clinton. Republicans. Democrats. Pope Benedict. Pope Francis. We like to be on one team, and call the other team evil. Or stupid. Or crazy. But is there really any other team more important than being on Team Jesus?

Homily given at Saints Joachim and Ann, St. Charles, Missouri, on September 30, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let Jesus tug your heart (10:00am)

Let Jesus tug your heart (10:00am)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 9:31
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

In the Buddhist understanding of the world, there is a statement that defines the personal experience. It is this: Life is suffering. Sometimes it is translated “to live is to suffer.” The reason for this is the fact that so much of life can be defined in this way. In fact, it can be expressed as two realities of our lives. Namely, suffering occurs when we do not have what we want. And, secondly, when we have what we don’t want. Our consumeristic society stresses again and again the first. We are convinced we cannot be happy without the latest smartphone, the best car or the nicest house. We want the job we do not have. And the second, having what we do not want, is about being afflicted with things we do not want. It can be sickness, loss of job, or a broken relationship, when we have the heartache of an experience charging into life. In Buddhism, the solution to all this is to work harder. In Christianity, the solution is to recognize that our hearts are restless until they rest in Jesus.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on September 23, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let Jesus tug your heart (5:00pm)

Let Jesus tug your heart (5:00pm)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 9:31
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

In the Buddhist understanding of the world, there is a statement that defines the personal experience. It is this: Life is suffering. Sometimes it is translated “to live is to suffer.” The reason for this is the fact that so much of life can be defined in this way. In fact, it can be expressed as two realities of our lives. Namely, suffering occurs when we do not have what we want. And, secondly, when we have what we don’t want. Our consumeristic society stresses again and again the first. We are convinced we cannot be happy without the latest smartphone, the best car or the nicest house. We want the job we do not have. And the second, having what we do not want, is about being afflicted with things we do not want. It can be sickness, loss of job, or a broken relationship, when we have the heartache of an experience charging into life. In Buddhism, the solution to all this is to work harder. In Christianity, the solution is to recognize that our hearts are restless until they rest in Jesus.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri, on September 22, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let Jesus tug your heart (10:00am)

Let Jesus tug your heart (10:00am)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 10:17
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

In the Buddhist understanding of the world, there is a statement that defines the personal experience. It is this: Life is suffering. Sometimes it is translated “to live is to suffer.” The reason for this is the fact that so much of life can be defined in this way. In fact, it can be expressed as two realities of our lives. Namely, suffering occurs when we do not have what we want. And, secondly, when we have what we don’t want. Our consumeristic society stresses again and again the first. We are convinced we cannot be happy without the latest smartphone, the best car or the nicest house. We want the job we do not have. And the second, having what we do not want, is about being afflicted with things we do not want. It can be sickness, loss of job, or a broken relationship, when we have the heartache of an experience charging into life. In Buddhism, the solution to all this is to work harder. In Christianity, the solution is to recognize that our hearts are restless until they rest in Jesus.

Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri, on September 23, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let Jesus tug your heart (5:00pm)

Let Jesus tug your heart (5:00pm)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 10:17
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

In the Buddhist understanding of the world, there is a statement that defines the personal experience. It is this: Life is suffering. Sometimes it is translated “to live is to suffer.” The reason for this is the fact that so much of life can be defined in this way. In fact, it can be expressed as two realities of our lives. Namely, suffering occurs when we do not have what we want. And, secondly, when we have what we don’t want. Our consumeristic society stresses again and again the first. We are convinced we cannot be happy without the latest smartphone, the best car or the nicest house. We want the job we do not have. And the second, having what we do not want, is about being afflicted with things we do not want. It can be sickness, loss of job, or a broken relationship, when we have the heartache of an experience charging into life. In Buddhism, the solution to all this is to work harder. In Christianity, the solution is to recognize that our hearts are restless until they rest in Jesus.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri, on September 22, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.