Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (11am)

Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (11am)

 
 
00:00 / 13:35
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

For some people, hearing a priest introduce a homily by mentioning the topic of vocations, means a homily on becoming a priest, sister or brother. And yet, while these are worthwhile vocations, most of the time there is a “checking out.” Why? Because for many, they are married, already having answered their call from God. For others, they are too old. For still others, they are too young. It seems important for all Catholics to recall that we all have a vocation. And for many, today’s readings stress the importance of marriage, the hurt of divorce, and the pain of mourning the loss of a long time spouse.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri, on October 6, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (9am)

Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (9am)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 13:35
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

For some people, hearing a priest introduce a homily by mentioning the topic of vocations, means a homily on becoming a priest, sister or brother. And yet, while these are worthwhile vocations, most of the time there is a “checking out.” Why? Because for many, they are married, already having answered their call from God. For others, they are too old. For still others, they are too young. It seems important for all Catholics to recall that we all have a vocation. And for many, today’s readings stress the importance of marriage, the hurt of divorce, and the pain of mourning the loss of a long time spouse.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri, on October 6, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (5pm)

Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (5pm)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
00:00 / 13:35
 
1X
 

Readings for Today

For some people, hearing a priest introduce a homily by mentioning the topic of vocations, means a homily on becoming a priest, sister or brother. And yet, while these are worthwhile vocations, most of the time there is a “checking out.” Why? Because for many, they are married, already having answered their call from God. For others, they are too old. For still others, they are too young. It seems important for all Catholics to recall that we all have a vocation. And for many, today’s readings stress the importance of marriage, the hurt of divorce, and the pain of mourning the loss of a long time spouse.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri, on October 6, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (11am)

Readings for Today

For some people, hearing a priest introduce a homily by mentioning the topic of vocations, means a homily on becoming a priest, sister or brother. And yet, while these are worthwhile vocations, most of the time there is a “checking out.” Why? Because for many, they are married, already having answered their call from God. For others, they are too old. For still others, they are too young. It seems important for all Catholics to recall that we all have a vocation. And for many, today’s readings stress the importance of marriage, the hurt of divorce, and the pain of mourning the loss of a long time spouse.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri, on October 9, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (9am)

Readings for Today

For some people, hearing a priest introduce a homily by mentioning the topic of vocations, means a homily on becoming a priest, sister or brother. And yet, while these are worthwhile vocations, most of the time there is a “checking out.” Why? Because for many, they are married, already having answered their call from God. For others, they are too old. For still others, they are too young. It seems important for all Catholics to recall that we all have a vocation. And for many, today’s readings stress the importance of marriage, the hurt of divorce, and the pain of mourning the loss of a long time spouse.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri, on October 9, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Let’s talk about vocations: Yours! (5pm)

Readings for Today

For some people, hearing a priest introduce a homily by mentioning the topic of vocations, means a homily on becoming a priest, sister or brother. And yet, while these are worthwhile vocations, most of the time there is a “checking out.” Why? Because for many, they are married, already having answered their call from God. For others, they are too old. For still others, they are too young. It seems important for all Catholics to recall that we all have a vocation. And for many, today’s readings stress the importance of marriage, the hurt of divorce, and the pain of mourning the loss of a long time spouse.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri, on October 6, 2018.
Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

US Bishops launch new marriage website

WASHINGTON—In conjunction with the start of National Marriage Week USA, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) is pleased to announce the launch of a new mobile responsive ForYourMarriage.org website on February 7, 2018.

Originally launched in 2007, ForYourMarriage.org is an initiative of the USCCB that began as the communications component of the National Pastoral Initiative for Marriage. It continues to play a key role in advancing the USCCB’s priority on marriage and family.

Thanks to a grant received from the Catholic Communication Campaign, the new website, developed in collaboration with Crosby Communications and Marketing, includes updated content, graphics, and a new section dedicated to marriage and family ministry leaders.

“I hope this new platform will reach many more people with the message of God’s plan for marriage and be a source of support to husbands and wives at every stage of their vocational journey,” said Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, OFM Cap, of Philadelphia, chairman of the bishops’ Committee on Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth.

ForYourMarriage.org offers numerous resources on the meaning and beauty of marriage in God’s plan and provides support to couples at every stage of their journey. There are sections dedicated to dating, marriage preparation, mixed marriages, parenting and family, natural family planning, the stages of marriage, among others. A marriage resource section offers daily marriage tips, marriage help and support links, and solutions to common challenges. Finally, questions specific to planning a Catholic wedding as well as related Church documents and teachings are available on the website.

Along with these resources, the website features couples who write about their real-life experiences as engaged, newlyweds, or seasoned couples with weekly blog posts. Feature articles include book reviews, reports on current events and research related to marriage, and recent teachings about marriage and family life from the Holy Father.

Other websites hosted by the USCCB and dedicated to promoting marriage include PorTuMatrimonio.org and MarriageUniqueForAReason.org.

Bishops’ Call To Prayer For Life, Marriage And Religious Liberty

The U.S. bishops invite the faithful to join a movement of prayer and sacrifice for the protection of life, marriage, and religious liberty in our country. Serious threats to each of these have raised unprecedented challenges to the Church and the nation. When confronted with challenges, our Lord calls us to sacrifice and pray. Follow the links below to learn more about how you can answer the Call.

For resources to use in your parish, click here.

A Noble Purpose: Homily for Thursday, June 8, 2017

A Noble Purpose: Homily for Thursday, June 8, 2017
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 6:29
 
1X
 

To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

The reality of prayer, especially a petition (asking God for something) or an intercession (praying on behalf of someone else) can be a challenging aspect of the spiritual life.  When a prayer is answered for something that seems utterly impossible, the result of a prayer, answered in a way we wish, can be overwhelming.

We can ask, why doesn’t God answer my prayers?  Why is it that when I see others who appear to have their prayers answered, mine do not?  When we pray to God, the authentic prayer is the result of an attitude of trust in the God who knows best.  It is not that God never answers our prayers, but rather, that God always answers our prayers, just not always in the way we expect.

Ordinary Spirituality: Homily for Monday, June 5, 2017

Ordinary Spirituality: Homily for Monday, June 5, 2017
Daily Homilies

 
 
00:00 / 6:58
 
1X
 

To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

The book of Tobit has a lot of ordinary events.  There is fighting between husband and wife.  There is the encounter with God.  There is marriage.  There is a profound recognition of helping the poor.  There are wonderful moments and extraordinary encounters with God.  All this week, the story of Tobit will guide us in the ongoing relationship we have with others.  How do we seek to find God?  Do we see marriage as a noble vocation? Are we able to admit that God may come to us even in ways we might at first not recognize?

The book of Tobit is also a book where people can both acknowledge the blessings from God, and at the same time recognize suffering.  Tobit loses sight.  The woman who will become his daughter-in-law has had tremendous misfortune as 7 of her husbands have died.  Through it all, the presence of God is clear and active.