The World Around Us: Homily for Friday, September 29, 2017

Readings for Today

Today’s readings serve as a reminder that the world around us is both physical and spiritual.  This can be easy to forget.  And yet, by going to Mass, or confession, or at a baptism, we are reminded of this fact.  Moreover, it is the case that it is precisely through the ordinary (water, bread, wine) that the extraordinary becomes part of our lives.

By celebrating the angels, especially those who had very important roles in the world and in our life of faith, we celebrate the desire to have God all around us.  And knowledge of these good spirits serve as a powerful protection against the evil in the world.

Thank God!: Homily for Saturday, June 10, 2017

To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

I am not nearly as grateful as I should be.  So much in  my life has been a gift I have not deserved.  Certainly the most important is the gift of my creation, my life, from God, which I did nothing to earn.  But there are the countless gifts I simply take for granted.  My basic needs are met.  My education has been provided by others.  The Dominican community which is so important to me has become so because of God’s mercy and the mercy of my brothers.  Again and Again, rather than seeing the overwhelming gifts I have been given, it seems more to me that I am too quick to take credit for my accomplishments, and too quick to focus on my sufferings.

Today’s first reading provides a wonderful picture of the fruit of gratitude.  With a grateful heart that seeks to be seen in a gift to a helpful stranger, Tobit encounters the living God in the Archangel Raphael.  While it certainly did not appear so to Tobit, God was always present in his life moving and acting in grace.  Show your gratitude today to see the active presence of God.

Help me to see: Homily for Friday, June 9, 2017

To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

Yesterday we saw the prayers of Sarah being answered.  Today, it is the prayer of Tobit.  But was the most important prayer really the regaining of his sight? Or, was it rather the realization that his son had embraced the faith so important to him?  Was it because he could see physically, or was it that he could see with pride how the grace of God was active in his own son’s life, and indeed in his own life?

Realization of the presence of God is amazing indeed.  Life in fact, seems so much clearer when we can see the events of our lives unfold not simply with our physical eyes, but also with the eyes of our soul.  It is this type of sight that often accounts for our ability to prioritize, to make important, and to determine the path of holiness which leads us to God.