Olives and pickles and what really eliminates hunger (Missionaries of Charity)

Olives and pickles and what really eliminates hunger (Missionaries of Charity)
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Readings for Today

I was blessed as a kid with two Thanksgiving dinners. The first was at my maternal grandmothers, then we went as a family to my father’s side of the family. What I remember about my grandmother’s Thanksgiving meal is that everyone played a part and brought something to the feast. Before the meal, I remember being so hungry.  The only thing on the table were dishes of pickles and olives. We ate them anyway, until we were scolded away. The meal was always wonderful, and the pies were excellent. But I am still hungry. Thank goodness the Eucharist fills my spiritual hunger forever.

Homily given at the Missionaries of Charity, Saint Louis, Missouri on August 5, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Olives and pickles and what really eliminates hunger

Readings for Today

I was blessed as a kid with two Thanksgiving dinners. The first was at my maternal grandmothers, then we went as a family to my father’s side of the family. What I remember about my grandmother’s Thanksgiving meal is that everyone played a part and brought something to the feast. Before the meal, I remember being so hungry.  The only thing on the table were dishes of pickles and olives. We ate them anyway, until we were scolded away. The meal was always wonderful, and the pies were excellent. But I am still hungry. Thank goodness the Eucharist fills my spiritual hunger forever.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri on August 4, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Olives and pickles and what really eliminates hunger (Our Lady of Lourdes)

Olives and pickles and what really eliminates hunger (Our Lady of Lourdes)
DePorres Pages Podcasts

 
 
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Readings for Today

I was blessed as a kid with two Thanksgiving dinners. The first was at my maternal grandmothers, then we went as a family to my father’s side of the family. What I remember about my grandmother’s Thanksgiving meal is that everyone played a part and brought something to the feast. Before the meal, I remember being so hungry.  The only thing on the table were dishes of pickles and olives. We ate them anyway, until we were scolded away. The meal was always wonderful, and the pies were excellent. But I am still hungry. Thank goodness the Eucharist fills my spiritual hunger forever.

Homily given at Our Lady of Lourdes, University City, Missouri on August 4, 2018.
Photo by Pixabay.

Knowing your persepective: Homily for Thanksgiving, November 23, 2017

Readings for Today

So much of our lives revolves around how we see things.  Our perspective on life makes all the difference.  Are we optimistic? Sad? Do you seek the good in others? Do you mistrust everyone? Is God loving or judgmental? Do we trust God or doubt? Questions like these, and others, have a lot to do with how it is we see life.

Today’s gospel shows how easy it is to miss what is really important.  Nine are cured of leprosy, and for whatever reason, they cannot go back to thank Jesus.  Maybe they were too excited to see family.  Maybe the wonder of life returning to normal was too distracting.  For whatever reason, it was only one who said thank-you to Jesus. Being grateful for what we have makes it more likely we see other reasons to be thankful.  Give thanks to God today. You will find more blessings than you knew you had.

Adoration

The chapel at Christian Brothers chapel. The first time of adoration is scheduled for today.

New Feature: Now You Can Ask for Prayers

We are launching a new feature: you can ask us to pray for you.  From the beginning of creation, religious people have prayed for each other.  From the earliest days of Christianity, the words of Saint Paul in his first letter to the Thessalonians invited Christians to pray unceasingly.  “Rejoice always. Pray without ceasing. In all circumstances give thanks, for this is the will of God for you in Christ Jesus.” (1 Thess. 5:16-18)

Prayer can be many things.  Silent time with God.  Reading his Word in the bible.  Going to Mass and receiving the Eucharist.  Receiving other sacraments.  Singing, praising, thanking.

But perhaps the most common way people experience prayer is by asking God for his loving intercession into our lives.  We ask others to pray on our behalf.  We ask God for many things ourselves.  But there is a powerful feeling knowing that we can ask others to pray with and for us.

To help in making the statement that prayer is powerful, The DePorres Pages is launching a new feature where you can pray for others.  Simply click the “Request Prayer” button to submit your intention.  You can also email a prayer request to prayer@deporres.net.  Twice a day your intentions will be remembered.

You can also pray for these intentions yourselves.  To do so, just click the “pray” button.  You can reply to the request to let people know you have prayed for them.  Also, because thanksgiving and praise are important parts of prayer, if you want to submit a “praise report” for prayers answered, or to express thanksgiving, you can do that as well.

Let us pray for each other.

Thank God: Homily for Memorial of Saint Clare, Friday, August 11, 2017

Thank God: Homily for Memorial of Saint Clare, Friday, August 11, 2017
Daily Homilies

 
 
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To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

Thank God.  Do you thank God for his wonderful deeds? I remember when I was in the seminary going through a particularly difficult time.  My spiritual director asked me, “Do you thank God for the challenge?”  I must say the thought never occurred to me.  Thank God for something difficult? Who wants to thank God for difficult things?

And yet, think of the first reading today.  Despite the hardships and the complaining, the people thank God.  Think of the marvels they have seen.  They must be grateful. They must, above all else, know that God is God alone.  Because there will be difficult days too.  Jesus reminds us of this in the gospel.  We will have to take up our cross and follow Jesus.  There is nothing that can compare to the worth of our soul.  It is more valuable than anything we could ever acquire.  So whatever you do, do not trade your soul.  Thank God for all he has done.

Daily prayer for July 4, 2017

Dear Father God, we live in a world where injustice is rife, freedoms are rapidly being removed and persecution of believers is on the increase. We come to You Father to lay before You men and women we may know personally, who have had their freedoms removed, together with the thousands of believers, whom we do not know. Lord – each one is precious in Your sight, for each one is a blood-bought child of Yours.

Be with all who are suffering injustice and loss of their freedoms, whether through government restrictions or groups that are intent on harming those that belong to You – and give wisdom to the men and ministries that are seeking to support those that have been affected in this way.

Lord we know that only when Jesus returns will true justice be restored and true freedom be established. Keep each one of Your children under the protection of Your wing, and may all who trust in Christ find their rest in Him – knowing that He is able and willing to support in time of need and to help in time of trouble – for He is our ever present …

Amen

From: http://prayer.knowing-jesus.com/Prayers-for-Freedom

Our Father: Homily for Thursday, June 22, 2017

Our Father: Homily for Thursday, June 22, 2017
Daily Homilies

 
 
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To hear the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

How many times does a person pray the “Our Father” in a day, or in a lifetime? Often, really. But how often does a person really think about the words of the prayer?  There is so much richness in such a simple prayer. First, there is the acknowledgement that the prayer is one of community.  It is the “Our” Father, not the “My” Father.  It reminds us that in all prayer there should be an element of praise and thanksgiving.  There is the dependence upon God for everything.  There is the need to forgive.  There is the need we all have to be forgiven by God, and the connection between the two.

This prayer is a model for all prayer.  The basic outline of this prayer reminds us what it takes to pray.  The simplicity of the prayer invites us to reflection.  We are invited by God to contemplate the meaning of such a simple yet powerful prayer.  Most of all, this prayer brings us into the loving relationship with the Father.  While a short homily cannot exhaust the richness of this prayer, it does call us to think about our relationship with God and the loving embrace to which we are all called.

Fundraising: Homily for Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Fundraising: Homily for Tuesday, June 20, 2017
Daily Homilies

 
 
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To listen to the entire homily, click here.

Readings for Today

How many of us have ever said, I hate to ask for money?  Asking for money can make us uncomforatble.  There are priests who say they hate talking about money.  Why is this? Since fundraising is such an important part of any mission or ministry, why is it that we do not like to do it, especially when we believe in the mission?  Perhaps it is because in asking for money, we focus on ourselves, and not on the mission.

Saint Paul in today’s reading expresses gratitude for a community, a local church where he preaches, that gave generously for the mission.  In doing so, he seeks to encourage another church to give generously as well.  What about you? Will you beg for the sake of the kingdom of God? Will you give to the mission of proclaiming the kingdom?